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  • ENERGY CODE UPDATE – CEC APRIL 10 HEARING

    Posted: April 13, 2015 | Posted by Crystal Whitfield | No Comments

    Although the new CA Energy Code – commonly referred to as Title 24 Standards – just came online earlier this year, the state is already about to adopt an updated standard.

    Today, we are attending a meeting at the Energy Commission regarding the 2013 Energy Code Standards where we will carry forward your feedback about policy and cost concerns.

    A number of CBPA members have let us know that the lighting control issue is having a major impact on costs and complexity of Tenant Improvements.  This issue has been discussed at length at several board meetings, and we have used anecdotal information to work with staff and commissioners to get the item on the agenda for review.  However, we still need some actual examples that we can use to advocate changes to the regulation.  These examples can be used sans company name.  If you can provide assistance on this issue please let us know.

    Businesses Are in the Dark About New Lighting Regulations

    The last update (those you started feeling in January) was the greatest increase in stringency (27%) since the beginning of the California energy code.  The proposed 2016 Standards are following with increase in stringency from significant changes for control requirements.

    Many members have expressed the concern that such large increases in energy code stringency require changes that are not proven construction practices.  We have expressed strong reservations to changes in construction and/or management practice that are not market proven, accepted in the building code, and vetted for their intended use by the building and inspection trades.

    Additionally, we are asking for more specific economic impact analysis on the changes being proposed.  Statute requires agencies proposing changes to building standards for commercial buildings to include the estimated cost of compliance.  We believe that a realistic cost-benefit analysis is essential in helping Commissioners make decisions.



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