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  • COASTAL COMMISSION BILLS LIMITING ACCESS OPPOSE

    Posted: July 1, 2016 | Posted by CBPA | No Comments

    Two bill that seek to limit access by project proponents to the Coastal Commission both passed through separate policy committees this week on party line votes in the Assembly and Senate, despite strong opposition and are up for hearing and strongly opposed by CBPA and local government groups.  Even if your company does not own property near the coast the precedent these bills will set will act as a chilling effect for public access to other regulatory agencies.

    AB 2002 (Stone – D) Would require a California Coastal Commission member to fully disclose in writing 24 hours before a commission hearing any ex parte communication conducted within 7 days of the commission hearing relating to a matter that will be discussed at the hearing, and would prohibit a commission member or an interested person from conducting such an ex parte communication within 24 hours before the commission hearing. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws. OPPOSE.

    SB 1190 (Jackson – D) Would prohibit a California Coastal Commission member or an interested person from intentionally conducting any ex parte communication or any oral or written communication regarding a pending enforcement investigation that does not occur in a public hearing, workshop, or other official proceeding, or on the official record of the proceeding on the matter. OPPOSE.

    The California Coastal Commission is responsible for land use and permitting decisions along the 1,100-mile California coastline. Among other things, the Commission has authority to issue coastal development permits in areas without local coastal programs (LCPs) and act on appeals from areas with LCPs on matters ranging from small issues such as constructing or remodeling single family residences, to major public works projects, as well as enforcement issues, cease and desist orders, and matters in litigation.



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